Browse Items (34 total)

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Darwin refers to Mary Treat’s published work ‘Observations on the Sundew’, American Naturalist Vol. VII, (December, 1873), pp. 705 – 708.

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Darwin’s Latin statement, most likely translated by his son Francis, on certain baboons’ sexual attraction to human females.

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The author cites Darwin’s use of Latin in a footnote on p.13 of Descent, vol. 1 which veiled a statement on baboons’ sexual attraction to human females. Here, the author not only translates elements of the Latin into English but also provides an…

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The author reassures his audience that he has dealt with his subject matter with great delicacy and therefore, unlike Darwin, not found it necessary “to cloak any part of [the] lecture in the obscurity of a learned language”.

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A review from the American monthly journal The Galaxy went one step further, replacing the word ‘sex’ with ‘sea’.

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A review of Descent in the popular American journal Harper’s New Monthly, which misquoted the title of the book in the same way as the Bradford Observer.

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A review of Descent published in the Bradford Observer which adopted the common strategy of substituting the word ‘sex’ for the more palatable ‘sexes’ in the title of Descent.

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The delicate and difficult nature of its content made it tricky for a reviewer from the literary journal Athenaeum to discuss certain sections of Descent at any considerable length.

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The official organ of the Philosophical Radicals, the Westminster Review, also praised Darwin for handling sensitive subject matter in a temperate, cautious and modest way.
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